What Can you do with $1,400 a Month?

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I don’t know about you, but for me, not much. But according to the Social Security Administration, that is approximately the average monthly benefits that retired seniors were receiving as of December of 2016. This highlights the importance of having limited reliance on Social Security income later in life. It is no longer enough to have something to supplement Social Security, but it is looking more and more like Social Security itself is the supplement rather than the main source of income. Currently, we spend a third of that amount in my household for food per month. It is imperative that we plan appropriately if we want to maintain a decent standard of living. We do not have to live lavish lifestyles, while that would be nice, but it would also be rather unfortunate if we worked for 40+ years and ended up living in squalor in our old age.

Although I am relatively young, I place great value in planning for retirement. After all, due to the effects of compounding, time is not only of the essence, time is our friend, so we must start early. The more time we have, the more opportunities there are both for growth and for recovery in the event of a downturn. The time is now to build that solid nest egg. Barring an accident or illness, I have at least another 30 years of work left in me, 31 to be exact. I have been actively saving for retirement since June 2007. That is 41 years of full time work where wise lifestyle choices and prudent investments will come together to ensure that I live the life that I earned throughout my working career. Note that I didn’t say the life that I wanted. Because when it comes to being retired, you don’t get the life you want, you get the life you deserve. As harsh as it sounds, it is our reality.

Different practices both as a result of changes in our political landscape and employers’ decreased willingness to contribute to their employees lifestyle, has drastically modified retirement outcomes. There are fewer and fewer pension options for people who dedicate their lives to serving the public or helping advance companies. Most of our futures now depend on market volatility. Even those with pensions are now beginning to supplement their defined benefits with additional investments in 401ks or 403bs.

I know there is an older segment of our population that reasonably had expectations for a pension since that was the practice at the time. Unfortunately, things started changing later in their careers and they did not have the time to save enough to bridge the unanticipated gap. There are also changing factors like longer life expectancy that plays a significant role in the “nasty surprise” our seniors face when they began to outlive their funds. For example my former roommate actually told me that her grandmother outlived her retirement funds by 14 years. While she may have planned, she didn’t necessary plan to live to be 90 because back when she was in the working world, that was unheard of.

So we’ve identified the problem, but what steps are we taking to make sure we don’t fall victim to a lack of planning? Here’s what I’m doing:

Traditional IRA: I rolled over my 401k into a traditional IRA from a previous job approximately 3 years ago and today I contribute to it monthly.

401k: Unfortunately, this new job no longer offers a match but I can still save pre-tax so I started out by contributing $25 a pay period and increased it gradually until it reached 10% of my income.

Pension: I am eligible for a pension at age 55 if I work at least 10 years and the amount I am eligible to receive increases every year I work past the 10 years. I will most likely work at least the 10 years to ensure that I become eligible.

Real Estate Sales (Today): Selling real estate is a way of boosting my Social Security Income because the Self-Employment Tax that I pay out of my real estate income contributes to my social security payments.

Real Estate Sales (Later): I also plan to continue doing part time real estate sales a few years after I retire from my regular job. This will supplement my retirement income for the first 5-7 years delaying any distributions I will have to take to allow my investments to grow further.

Rental Properties: They are the gift that keep on giving. They don’t require much effort. As I get older, I will probably spend more money to outsource some of the services so I will no longer have to deal with tenants, but by then, my mortgage will be gone and my rents will likely increase so I don’t anticipate a significant drop in my margins.

Reduce Expenses: I will be doing my best to avoid debt, I will consider downsizing to one car, and my living expenses should decrease significantly as the mortgage on our primary residence will be gone.

What are you doing?

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How we use our Employment Benefits to Maximize Every Dollar

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There is more to your job than just your salary. Most people receive some kind of benefit at work. Whether they are non monetary like a flexible schedule or more tangible like an employee discount, we get more from our employers than our paychecks. Here are four valuable benefits that we use (or have used in the past).

401K Match: For 5 years, I worked at a company that offered a 100% match for retirement contribution up to 6% of your salary. From the first day I started working, I made sure to contribute at least the 6% that would get me the 100% company match. Anything less would seem like I am leaving free money behind. I left that firm over 4 years ago and no longer receive a match at my new place of employment. However, my husband does receive a similar benefit (100% match up to 5% of his salary) and we make sure to take advantage of it. So now, when he contributes 10% of his salary, his account is actually receiving a deposit of 15%.

Graduate School: I often discuss my journey to becoming debt free and instrumental in all of that is the elimination of my student loan debt due to the high interest rate. I graduated 2 years ago in May from a program that cost $75K. However my loans were less than $50K thanks to the tuition assistance I received when I first started the MBA program. I did switch jobs in the middle of graduate school, which contributed to the balance of my loan, however, I am $28k closer to completing my payments as a result of being able to benefit from the tuition program early on in my studies.

Cellphone Discount: We have a family plan with 3 lines for smart phones that gives all the users unlimited data and text. If that sounds pricey, it’s because it is. However, my carrier offers an 18% discount to employees of my organization. Every 2-3 years, I recertify my employment by providing a either a scanned copy of my badge, a pay stub or some other form that would indicate I still work there.

BJ’s Wholesale Club: A BJ’s membership costs $50 a year for 2 people. Given the savings opportunities that buying in bulk offers, not to mention the low gas prices, that is already a fantastic deal. However, my husband’s job offers a discount where the membership costs less and is for a longer period of time: $40 for 16 months. Per month, the discounted price is nearly 1/2 the regular advertised price.

How are you maximizing your employee benefits?

Prey to Play: Exploiting Black Misinformation

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In a country built on a legacy of race-based abuse and marginalization, it should be a surprise to no one that segregation was the norm until HUD decided to outlaw discriminatory norms that after several decades (excluding centuries of slavery since “property” cannot own property) of people of color, mainly blacks, being locked out of financial markets. Then redlining moved from exclusionary practices to predation. As recently as the early 2000s, communities of color were still targets for predatory lending practices, which do nothing to alleviate the inequalities we continue to witness between different demographics regarding generational wealth. However, I am becoming just as alarmed by the defeatist attitude and victim mentality of some black people as I am outraged by the systematic and oppressive treatment perpetuated by powerful institutions.

Thanks to the internet, everyone, including myself, has a soap box. High speed internet and free platforms has given rise to a multitude of different social justice movements, of which, many are catalysts for change, some are questionable and some others I find without merit. Among those that I find to be without merit, are those that really call for what seems to be throwing in the towel and making no efforts toward self-improvement because after all, the boot is on our neck, so why should we even bother breathing? Let’s just hold our breath and die right here. While this might be a simplistic summarization of it all, I struggle to extract any other point from the message when the systemic oppression is continuously highlighted with any educational effort made to provide solutions to the problem.

“We are kept out of financial markets! We don’t own homes! We don’t have infrastructure in our neighborhood! We don’t have retirement accounts!”

But, there is no effort to save, to attend a home buyer class, to build a business to request a pamphlet from the employer about what 401k plans are available. Meanwhile, anyone who makes an attempt at providing the information is quickly labeled “classist”, tool of white supremacy and is bombarded with an overwhelming list of excuses reasons why they can’t get a job, save money, have decent credit, own a home, travel, etc.

Everyone is complaining about what are real problems, but do so without seeking real answers. Identifying the concerns are a first step but not even half of the battle. Education followed by action are still necessary to reverse course. Although, sometimes I can’t help but wonder if the e-SJWs actually want to see changes.

They might very well be afraid because struggle, while uncomfortable, is not unknown so there might be a sense of safety there. Struggle can be used as a crutch to escape accountability. At the same time, there is also the possibility that they might  run out of discussion topics that will generate adequate traffic to their pages and build their following. That pool of fans is actually a critical source of donation money for those who chose to crowdfund their lives rather than work. If their entire platform is built on enumerating the ills of the community, what will they talk about when most people have taken definitive steps towards self-improvement? To me, that in itself is a form of exploitation. That is the equivalent of not teaching a man to fish, not even giving him a fish, but instead, complaining about how hungry you both are just because you want company. It is unfair and self-serving to keep people ignorant in order to build a platform off their misinformation. With the accessibility of the internet and the amount of people willing to provide the right information for next to nothing, it would probably be less work-intensive, and definitely be less abusive, to get a job than to keep our peers misinformed.

We shouldn’t encourage mediocrity just because the playing field is not leveled. Just because we can’t close the gap, doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try and bridge it. After all, the world doesn’t end with us after we are gone. There are still future generations for whom we can make the world a little better. Our forefathers who fought for freedom did not get to live to see integration, but they laid the ground work for the civil rights movement. Doing anything less than putting up a good fight is regression. We have to do better. Black exploitation isn’t suddenly fashionable because the perpetrator is not white.

Question Everything

I don’t mean to speak for anyone but I’d like to think that we work hard for our money and we would like to keep it. That’s why I discussed fraudulent investments earlier and some of their tell-tale signs to help you recognize and avoid them. But people can be really crafty when it’s time to con you out of some cash.

If the proposed investment initially passes the smell test, here are three questions you can ask to further pull back some layers and determine the merits of the deal:

Does the dealer have a license? Even with the best of intention, the market has shown that it cannot be trusted to regulate itself. The best way of ensuring that people and organizations are doing the right thing is to have the threat of severe penalties (usually financial) hanging over their head. Unlicensed advisers are illegal and accountable to no one. Furthermore, we do not know what their qualifications are.

Does the risk/reward structure make sense? “High risk, high reward” is a common cliche, but it is true. If someone is offering a low risk guaranteed investment, the returns will likely be very low. The opposite applies if the rewards are significant. The risk is likely to be high and the returns will not be guaranteed. Anything different is likely a scam, or at best it is misrepresented.

Is the investment registered? It is similar to an unlicensed dealer. Who is tracking and regulating the security if it is unregistered? Personally, I do not like to rely on a company that is financially invested in me being uninformed for the truth. Registering a security ensures that the SEC, an independent government organization will ensure transparency by providing you with the necessary information to make good choices.

Introduction to Investing

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I often talk about the importance of financial independence; at least to me. However you can’t achieve that through working only. Your earning potential is limited as a wage earner and only the most exceptional and/or connected will ever get to a salary level where their earnings alone will make them independently wealthy. So the rest of us turn to investments.

The approach that I take to investment is to look at every dollar I have as an employee. They are supposed to work and be productive. If they aren’t working they are costing me and I need to find an activity for them. But the drawback is finding the right “work site”. I believe that diversification is extremely important. Some of my dollars are doing heavy lifting in the real estate market, some are doing lazy work in CDs and savings and others are doing risky work in the stock market. That is my way of diversifying.

Diversification is an old and basic investment concept. It is a tool used to spread out your risk to ensure that you don’t have all your eggs in one basket. In my case, I use real estate as a mechanism to provide me with guaranteed cash flow since people will always need a place to live. I use my CD and savings accounts to provide me with flexibility and liquidity. Meanwhile, I use my stock market investments as a tax tool since they are work sponsored retirement plans.

My husband finds humor in me saying that investing is fun. But the truth is, the fun doesn’t stem from the process of learning to navigate the market or feeling my stomach drop every time a bad political move causes the DOW to fluctuate or mortgage rates to spike. The fun comes in knowing that even when I sleep, I’m still earning money. When I’m working, I’m earning my wage was well as money from all of my investments. I don’t have to work as hard but I can make more money than the person sitting next to me for the same amount of work.

However, as much fun as it is when you’re performing well, investing can be tricky. A lot of investments, particularly stock market investments are volatile. Not only that, they are also not backed by the full faith of the U.S. government. My CDs are in a banking institution that carries insurance on my deposit up to $250,000. If I put that same amount in the stock market today, I could wake up tomorrow and have it disappear with no recourse. In a best case scenario, I will retire at 62 or 67 with a million dollar portfolio that will give me enough dividends to live on until I die. The goal is to not outlive my investments. But there are no guarantees. And even when I get my way, I’m still going to be subject to both emotional and financial roller coaster rides over the next 30 years.

None of this means that the industry is unregulated. The Securities and Exchange Commission is the agency that oversees investment advisers and enforces securities laws. But they are just there to make sure that the companies don’t get away with committing fraud, not to guarantee your investments. And even with the regulations in place, even the law enforcement safeguards in place do not guarantee safety as you know by Bernie Madoff’s actions. So it is best to know what you are doing and how to protect yourself by being informed. There is a plethora of resources available and I hope to share them with you here.

Path to a Million: 2017 Q1

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This is my first update since the initial posts (announcing the start of the series and the pilot post). Things are going well, maybe better than I expected because a great thing happened: tax season! *eyeroll* (take some time to read this post about why it’s not a windfall you should rejoice in).

However, in my case I can rejoice just a little. Part of my big refund had less to do with my lax W4 allowances, but because we had some credits for energy efficient updates, primarily in the form of solar panels and we were able to use the cost of depreciation to offset our rental income.

Tax season came through for some serious debt reduction which had a snowball effect on our net worth. It will reduce our liability (once I get around to actually making the large payment) and free up cash that was normally going to satisfying my monthly student loan payments, to put towards investments/savings. This really does show the positive effects and importance of eliminating debt. Of course, we continued to pay down all our other obligations as well, but using our refund to all but eliminating student loans will make the most significant impact.

 

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Last quarter, I recorded my net worth at $369,922. This time, it’s $389,213, up $19,291. This represents an average increase of just under $6,500 every month. Although most of that is achieved by reducing debt, it’s a start, and a very good one. Debt plays significant role in our financial struggles and if we can consistently decrease our debts over time rather than add to them, we have the right attitudes and the necessary tools to build wealth, because the idea is that, once the debt is gone, we can use the same disciplined approach towards investing to gain even more speed towards financial independence.

*See Pilot post for more info on loans.

10 things everyone should do before 30 to improve their financial lives

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Whether it’s due to helicopter parenting, growing up in rough economic times, or some combination of both, millennials are not thriving economically. It is becoming such a problem from older millennials like myself who have been out on their own for a number of years, that people are actually cashing in on our generation’s lack of preparation. I was listening to an NPR piece about an “adulting school” where young adults can enroll in classes to learn basic skills like folding fitted sheets (seriously!), creating a budget, cooking basic meals, understanding banking, etc. People enroll in those courses because they don’t know where to start. So today, I’m offering you a starting point: a list of what you should have a handle on to ensure a smoother ride. At least, if you do decide to enroll in adulting school, you’ll know exactly what classes will fit your needs.

  1. Have emergency savings of at least $1,000
  2. Be free of credit card debt
  3. Have concrete goals for the short, intermediate and long term
  4. Start saving for retirement
  5. Learn to cook 5 nutritious meals
  6. Learn investment basics
  7. Have a budget and stick to it
  8. Be adequately insured
  9. Give up instant gratification
  10. Improve your credit score