What Can you do with $1,400 a Month?

SS

I don’t know about you, but for me, not much. But according to the Social Security Administration, that is approximately the average monthly benefits that retired seniors were receiving as of December of 2016. This highlights the importance of having limited reliance on Social Security income later in life. It is no longer enough to have something to supplement Social Security, but it is looking more and more like Social Security itself is the supplement rather than the main source of income. Currently, we spend a third of that amount in my household for food per month. It is imperative that we plan appropriately if we want to maintain a decent standard of living. We do not have to live lavish lifestyles, while that would be nice, but it would also be rather unfortunate if we worked for 40+ years and ended up living in squalor in our old age.

Although I am relatively young, I place great value in planning for retirement. After all, due to the effects of compounding, time is not only of the essence, time is our friend, so we must start early. The more time we have, the more opportunities there are both for growth and for recovery in the event of a downturn. The time is now to build that solid nest egg. Barring an accident or illness, I have at least another 30 years of work left in me, 31 to be exact. I have been actively saving for retirement since June 2007. That is 41 years of full time work where wise lifestyle choices and prudent investments will come together to ensure that I live the life that I earned throughout my working career. Note that I didn’t say the life that I wanted. Because when it comes to being retired, you don’t get the life you want, you get the life you deserve. As harsh as it sounds, it is our reality.

Different practices both as a result of changes in our political landscape and employers’ decreased willingness to contribute to their employees lifestyle, has drastically modified retirement outcomes. There are fewer and fewer pension options for people who dedicate their lives to serving the public or helping advance companies. Most of our futures now depend on market volatility. Even those with pensions are now beginning to supplement their defined benefits with additional investments in 401ks or 403bs.

I know there is an older segment of our population that reasonably had expectations for a pension since that was the practice at the time. Unfortunately, things started changing later in their careers and they did not have the time to save enough to bridge the unanticipated gap. There are also changing factors like longer life expectancy that plays a significant role in the “nasty surprise” our seniors face when they began to outlive their funds. For example my former roommate actually told me that her grandmother outlived her retirement funds by 14 years. While she may have planned, she didn’t necessary plan to live to be 90 because back when she was in the working world, that was unheard of.

So we’ve identified the problem, but what steps are we taking to make sure we don’t fall victim to a lack of planning? Here’s what I’m doing:

Traditional IRA: I rolled over my 401k into a traditional IRA from a previous job approximately 3 years ago and today I contribute to it monthly.

401k: Unfortunately, this new job no longer offers a match but I can still save pre-tax so I started out by contributing $25 a pay period and increased it gradually until it reached 10% of my income.

Pension: I am eligible for a pension at age 55 if I work at least 10 years and the amount I am eligible to receive increases every year I work past the 10 years. I will most likely work at least the 10 years to ensure that I become eligible.

Real Estate Sales (Today): Selling real estate is a way of boosting my Social Security Income because the Self-Employment Tax that I pay out of my real estate income contributes to my social security payments.

Real Estate Sales (Later): I also plan to continue doing part time real estate sales a few years after I retire from my regular job. This will supplement my retirement income for the first 5-7 years delaying any distributions I will have to take to allow my investments to grow further.

Rental Properties: They are the gift that keep on giving. They don’t require much effort. As I get older, I will probably spend more money to outsource some of the services so I will no longer have to deal with tenants, but by then, my mortgage will be gone and my rents will likely increase so I don’t anticipate a significant drop in my margins.

Reduce Expenses: I will be doing my best to avoid debt, I will consider downsizing to one car, and my living expenses should decrease significantly as the mortgage on our primary residence will be gone.

What are you doing?

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Question Everything

I don’t mean to speak for anyone but I’d like to think that we work hard for our money and we would like to keep it. That’s why I discussed fraudulent investments earlier and some of their tell-tale signs to help you recognize and avoid them. But people can be really crafty when it’s time to con you out of some cash.

If the proposed investment initially passes the smell test, here are three questions you can ask to further pull back some layers and determine the merits of the deal:

Does the dealer have a license? Even with the best of intention, the market has shown that it cannot be trusted to regulate itself. The best way of ensuring that people and organizations are doing the right thing is to have the threat of severe penalties (usually financial) hanging over their head. Unlicensed advisers are illegal and accountable to no one. Furthermore, we do not know what their qualifications are.

Does the risk/reward structure make sense? “High risk, high reward” is a common cliche, but it is true. If someone is offering a low risk guaranteed investment, the returns will likely be very low. The opposite applies if the rewards are significant. The risk is likely to be high and the returns will not be guaranteed. Anything different is likely a scam, or at best it is misrepresented.

Is the investment registered? It is similar to an unlicensed dealer. Who is tracking and regulating the security if it is unregistered? Personally, I do not like to rely on a company that is financially invested in me being uninformed for the truth. Registering a security ensures that the SEC, an independent government organization will ensure transparency by providing you with the necessary information to make good choices.

Introduction to Investing

Investing

I often talk about the importance of financial independence; at least to me. However you can’t achieve that through working only. Your earning potential is limited as a wage earner and only the most exceptional and/or connected will ever get to a salary level where their earnings alone will make them independently wealthy. So the rest of us turn to investments.

The approach that I take to investment is to look at every dollar I have as an employee. They are supposed to work and be productive. If they aren’t working they are costing me and I need to find an activity for them. But the drawback is finding the right “work site”. I believe that diversification is extremely important. Some of my dollars are doing heavy lifting in the real estate market, some are doing lazy work in CDs and savings and others are doing risky work in the stock market. That is my way of diversifying.

Diversification is an old and basic investment concept. It is a tool used to spread out your risk to ensure that you don’t have all your eggs in one basket. In my case, I use real estate as a mechanism to provide me with guaranteed cash flow since people will always need a place to live. I use my CD and savings accounts to provide me with flexibility and liquidity. Meanwhile, I use my stock market investments as a tax tool since they are work sponsored retirement plans.

My husband finds humor in me saying that investing is fun. But the truth is, the fun doesn’t stem from the process of learning to navigate the market or feeling my stomach drop every time a bad political move causes the DOW to fluctuate or mortgage rates to spike. The fun comes in knowing that even when I sleep, I’m still earning money. When I’m working, I’m earning my wage was well as money from all of my investments. I don’t have to work as hard but I can make more money than the person sitting next to me for the same amount of work.

However, as much fun as it is when you’re performing well, investing can be tricky. A lot of investments, particularly stock market investments are volatile. Not only that, they are also not backed by the full faith of the U.S. government. My CDs are in a banking institution that carries insurance on my deposit up to $250,000. If I put that same amount in the stock market today, I could wake up tomorrow and have it disappear with no recourse. In a best case scenario, I will retire at 62 or 67 with a million dollar portfolio that will give me enough dividends to live on until I die. The goal is to not outlive my investments. But there are no guarantees. And even when I get my way, I’m still going to be subject to both emotional and financial roller coaster rides over the next 30 years.

None of this means that the industry is unregulated. The Securities and Exchange Commission is the agency that oversees investment advisers and enforces securities laws. But they are just there to make sure that the companies don’t get away with committing fraud, not to guarantee your investments. And even with the regulations in place, even the law enforcement safeguards in place do not guarantee safety as you know by Bernie Madoff’s actions. So it is best to know what you are doing and how to protect yourself by being informed. There is a plethora of resources available and I hope to share them with you here.

Path to a Million: 2017 Q1

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This is my first update since the initial posts (announcing the start of the series and the pilot post). Things are going well, maybe better than I expected because a great thing happened: tax season! *eyeroll* (take some time to read this post about why it’s not a windfall you should rejoice in).

However, in my case I can rejoice just a little. Part of my big refund had less to do with my lax W4 allowances, but because we had some credits for energy efficient updates, primarily in the form of solar panels and we were able to use the cost of depreciation to offset our rental income.

Tax season came through for some serious debt reduction which had a snowball effect on our net worth. It will reduce our liability (once I get around to actually making the large payment) and free up cash that was normally going to satisfying my monthly student loan payments, to put towards investments/savings. This really does show the positive effects and importance of eliminating debt. Of course, we continued to pay down all our other obligations as well, but using our refund to all but eliminating student loans will make the most significant impact.

 

NW

 

Last quarter, I recorded my net worth at $369,922. This time, it’s $389,213, up $19,291. This represents an average increase of just under $6,500 every month. Although most of that is achieved by reducing debt, it’s a start, and a very good one. Debt plays significant role in our financial struggles and if we can consistently decrease our debts over time rather than add to them, we have the right attitudes and the necessary tools to build wealth, because the idea is that, once the debt is gone, we can use the same disciplined approach towards investing to gain even more speed towards financial independence.

*See Pilot post for more info on loans.

Path to a Million: 2016 Q4

This is the first installment in my “Path to a Million” series. I will use these posts to track my family’s net worth over time to record the progress we try to make in reducing expenses, eliminating debt, increasing our income and saving as much as possible to retire early and in style.

I have chosen a quarterly format which will give me enough time between updates to make leaps, recover from setbacks and fine tune anything that might not work as well as I would have wanted to. But it’s frequent enough to make it consistent, keep it interesting and prevent me from being complacent. I will also schedule it for the last Monday of the quarter, making it a “Monday Motivation” post both for myself and for those who might stumble upon it.

With that said, I am a bit apprehensive about posting this. For starters, it feels a little like financial exhibitionism. Telling people how  much you are worth in detail is like being naked, in part because of the stigma we attach to money. We tend to tie our self-worth to our net worth, in part due to a capitalist society built on poverty exploitation that has turned us into money-worshiping cult followers. In fact, even rich people have been known to inflate how rich they are, with some resulting to threats of litigation when the overinflation of their wealth is brought into question. (I don’t want to get sued so I won’t say his name, but you know who he is…)

But I’ve decided that I have nothing to be ashamed of. If anything, my story is one of inspiration. What do I have to lose by telling it? Either a bunch of people are going to see the details and be inspired or no one will even see it. I can’t lose and scenario 2 is more likely to happen anyway.

I am a 31-year old first generation American woman of color who started out with $5,000 almost 10 years ago in May of 2007 when I finished my bachelors. That $5,000 was composed of $1,000 I had saved after working part time all 4 years of college, $1,000 my dad gave me as a graduation present and $3,000 I got in monetary gifts from various guests at a surprise party my cousin threw for me. My first experience at “investing” was putting that  $5k in a long-term CD at Bank of America  where I was getting 5% at the time. That CD, my clothes and a 2000 Honda Accord was all I had in my name. No inheritance, no stocks, no homes. While I know I’m more fortunate than many others, I still have to point out that this was as close to starting from scratch as you could get. But I’m on a path to a million and I want to take you with me one quarter at a time. Your first insight is how  things have changed 9.5 years later.

Without further ado…