The Case Against Automatic Payments

Saying that you’re against automatic payment in the world of personal finance definitely makes one an outsider. Most personal finance bloggers or advisers will tell their audiences to set up automatic payments. The common argument is that you’re less likely to forget about a bill than your online banking software. If you tell your bank to pay your mortgage every 1st of the month, the bank is not going to forget. However, you can go on vacation or have a bad day and your mortgage is the last thing on your mind when the first rolls around. That is however just one perspective. I’d like to present my own case against why I oppose automatic payments and you should too.

Reviewing your bill. If your arrange your payments like an infomercial oven using the “set it and forget it” technique, you are likely not going to prioritize reviewing your bill. Which means, sneaky little charges that your providers use to nickel and dime you will get past you and that’s exactly what they want. For example, when Comcast decided to start charging me twice as much for some premium channels, I only noticed because I actively pay my bill every month and immediately saw that the total balance was different from what I was paying before. I went over my bill line by line and saw where the extra charges came from. A call to customer service revealed that my previous rate was a promotional rate and my promotion expired the month before. I got a credit for the charges and changed my bill to a new promotion so I wouldn’t have to pay the higher fee. Otherwise, this would have gone unnoticed. Not having automatic payments forces me to look at my bill and makes me remember what a normal payment looks like.

Ghost charges. Subscriptions for small items that we don’t even think about are what I call ghost charges. You don’t even know they are there. The fee is very low and it’s been so long since you’ve used it that you don’t even remember anymore. But like clockwork, $5, 10, or even $20 comes out of your bank account. In my case, I had a Planet Fitness membership for $20/month. I had it for several years but I eventually moved to a town where there was no PF. It took me 2 months to realize that I was still paying that bill. If it was something that I had to actively pay every month, I would have realized that I no longer had any use for the membership that I was still paying for. The same is likely to happen with magazines (does anyone besides doctor’s offices order those still?), subscription boxes, infomercials that will send you refills “for life” etc.

Overdrafts. When you go to pay your bills, you are aware of exactly how much money is in your account. You also know when you are about to be paid. You can set up your bill payments around your anticipated bank balances. I don’t think anyone should be living like that because it means you’re living paycheck to paycheck, but I also live in the real world and understand it’s the reality of many. If there is ever the possibility that you may not have enough money in your account, the $35 overdraft fee is not something you can afford. And even if you do have enough money, there are other risks, like the time one of my payments did not go through because my credit card had been compromised and my bank closed my card without notifying me.

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